Male reproductive system cancers

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The two main types of cancer that start in the male reproductive organs and genitals are prostate cancer and testicular cancer.

Specialist treatment and support for young people with cancer aged 15-25 is provided by the Youth Cancer Services (YCS) based in major hospitals throughout Australia. Canteen also offers events and other support for young people with cancer.

 

Prostate cancer

The prostate gland is a male reproductive organ that sits at the base of the bladder. It produces most of the fluid that makes up semen, which mixes with the sperm produced by the testicles.

Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer diagnosed in men (apart from common skin cancer). In most cases, it is a slow-growing disease, but sometimes it can grow and spread quickly.

Early, or localised prostate cancer, is where cancer cells have not spread beyond the prostate. Most cases of prostate cancer are diagnosed at this stage.

Advanced (or metastatic) prostate cancer is where the cancer spreads beyond the prostate gland.

 

Types of prostate cancer

The most common type of prostate cancer by far is adenocarcinoma, which develops from the cells that line the prostate gland.

Other types of cells in the prostate can also develop into prostate cancer. These rare cancers are:

  • Sarcomas
  • Small cell carcinomas
  • Neuroendocrine tumours or transitional cell carcinomas

Visit the Cancer Council website for more information about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer.

 

Testicular cancer

The testicles are the two small, egg-shaped glands behind the penis that produce sperm.

Testicular cancer is a rare cancer in Australia, but it is the 4th most common cancer in teenage boys and young men. 

Most testicular cancers start in the germ cells, the cells that make sperm. These are call germ cell cancers. There are two main types of germ cell cancers:

  • Non-seminomas: more common in younger men, usually in their late teens or early 20s
  • Seminomas: usually occurs in men aged 25 to 45 and tends to develop more slowly than non-seminoma cancers

Visit the Cancer Council website for more information about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of testicular cancer.

 

Penile cancer

Cancer of the penis is a rare type of cancer, affecting around 150 men a year in Australia. It occurs mostly in uncircumcised men.

Visit the Cancer Council website for more information about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of penile cancer.

 

 

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When cancer’s in your life, Canteen is in your corner.

 

Cancer affects everyone differently. That’s why Canteen provides a wide range of support services to help you overcome the specific challenges you’re dealing with.

Whether you’re dealing with your parent’s cancera brother or sister’s cancer or your own diagnosis, we have got your back. We also have newer services specifically for parents too.

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Visit the Cancer Council for more information about the causes, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of male reproductive system cancers