AYA Needs Measures

Siblings of cancer patients can experience very high levels of distress associated with family functioning, changes in family dynamics and unmet psychological and social needs. AYA siblings of cancer patients have reported clinically relevant emotional problems 2 years after their sibling’s diagnosis.

The Sibling Cancer Needs Inventory (SCNI) is the first measure of psychological and social unmet needs developed for young people aged 12-24 who had a sibling diagnosed with cancer within the last 5 years. It includes 45 questions within 7 domains (information; practical assistance; “time out” and recreation; feelings; support (friends and other young people); understanding from my family; and sibling relationship), and has been found to have good internal consistency, validity, and reliability.

It was developed by Canteen by qualitatively exploring the needs of young people who have a sibling with cancer and quantitatively assessing the psychometric properties of the measure.

The measure is intended to be used in clinical settings to identify an individuals’ unmet psychological and social needs as well as identifying specific areas of need (i.e., by looking at individual domains) to facilitate the provision of targeted support.

 

To access the measure, please click here.

 

To read further on this measure, please click on the links below:

The development of an instrument to assess the unmet needs of young people who have a sibling with Cancer: piloting the sibling cancer needs Instrument (SCNI)

Psychometric evaluation of the sibling cancer needs instrument (SNCI): an instrument to assess the psychosocial unmet needs of young people who are siblings of cancer patients

Predictors of unmet needs and psychological distress in adolescent and young adult siblings of people diagnosed with cancer

Young people with a parent with cancer can experience elevated levels of psychological distress and unmet needs. Adolescence and young adulthood is a period of physical, emotional and mental development and is a time when typically, offspring are establishing a more equal relationship with their parents and reaching important milestones such as financial independence. Having a parent with cancer can disrupt this transition to adulthood and cause considerable distress.

The OCNI is the first measure of psychosocial unmet needs developed for young people aged 12-24 who have a parent with cancer. It includes 47 items within 7 domains: information; family issues; practical assistance; time out; feelings; support (friends) and support (other young people). The measure has been found to have good internal consistency, validity and reliability.

It was developed by Canteen by qualitatively exploring the needs of young people who have a parent with cancer and quantitatively assessing the psychometric properties of the measure.

The measure is intended to be used in clinical settings to identify an individuals’ unmet psychological and social needs as well as identifying specific areas of need (i.e., by looking at individual domains) to facilitate the provision of targeted support.

 

To access the measure, please click here.

 

To read further on this measure, please click on the links below:

The initial development of an instrument to assess the psychosocial needs and unmet needs of young people who have a parent with cancer: piloting the offspring cancer needs instrument (OCNI)

Psychometric evaluation of the Offspring Cancer Needs Instrument (OCNI): an instrument to assess the psychosocial unmet needs of young people who have a parent with cancer

Correlates of unmet needs and psychological distress in adolescents and young adults who have a parent diagnosed with cancer

If you have more questions about the measures above, please contact the Canteen Research Team on researchteam@canteen.org.au